MoMA Reconstructions

MoMA Reconstructions

Reconstructions: Architecture and Blackness in America

Feb 27–May 31, 2021
Website https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/5219

It was quiet inside the MoMA. Its doors already closed, all visitors departed hours ago.
But there was some muted activity in the galleries on the third floor with its windows looking out over the MoMA garden. Two cameras with huge fisheye lenses set on top of a dolly that was making its way around the artwork.
The exhibition that was filmed in 360 that night at the museum was Reconstructions: Architecture and Blackness in America and featured newly commissioned works by 10 architects, designers, and artists “that explore ways in which histories can be made visible…”.
It was two weeks before closing. The purpose of the 360 video was to preserve a record of this landmark exhibition. It was the first time that the works of black architects were exhibited at the MoMA.
The exhibition was organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator in the Department of Architecture and Design of The Museum of Modern Art at that time, and Mabel O. Wilson, Nancy and George E. Rupp Professor at Columbia University.

“How does race structure America’s cities? …
Centuries of disenfranchisement and race-based violence have led to a built environment that is not only compromised but also, as the critic Ta-Nehisi Coates contends, “argues against the truth of who you are.” These injustices are embedded in nearly every aspect of America’s design—an inheritance of segregated neighborhoods, compromised infrastructures, environmental toxins, and unequal access to financial and educational institutions.
Each project in the exhibition proposes an intervention in one of 10 cities: from the front porches of Miami and the bayous of New Orleans to the freeways of Oakland and Syracuse. Reconstructions examines the intersections of anti-Black racism and Blackness within urban spaces as sites of resistance and refusal…”

The artworks, a mix of sculptures, collages, prints and paintings, were captured with a majority of moving shots with the aforementioned dolly. The movement gives them dimension and provides context of their size, the room  and their relationships to the other artworks.
Post-production posed a distinct challenge of its own: which of the artworks to include and which ones to leave out for a ~ 5 minute video?
Due to the impossibility to assign more or less importance to any of the works, the decision was reached to showcase all of them in the 360 video. Moving through the space the viewer hears the voices of the artists talking about their works as well as the audio or music that accompanied the works in the gallery. At some points in the video is augmented by the works detaching from the wall and floating closer to the viewer.

Included Projects:
Mario Gooden. The Refusal of Space. Nashville, TN
Yolanda Daniels, Black City: The Los Angeles Edition, Los Angeles, CA
Sekou Cooke, We Outchea, Syracuse, NY
Felecia Davis, Fabricating Networks, Hill District, Pittsburgh, PA
Germane Barnes, A Spectrum of Blackness, Miami, FL
Emanuel Admassu, Immeasurability, Atlanta, GA
Mitch McEwen, R:R,New Orleans, LA
Walter J. Hood, Black Towers / Black Power, Oakland, CA
Olalekan Jeyifous, The Frozen Neighborhoods, Crown Heights, Brooklyn, NY
Amanda Williams, “We’re Not Down There, We’re Over Here”, Kinloch, MO

Credits:

Producer: Aaron Louis, Director of Audio Visual, MoMA
360 video production: Koncept VR, NYC
Director/VFX: Joergen Geerds, Koncept VR
Cinematographer/Editor: Ulrike Futschik, Koncept VR

Special thanks to Sean Anderson, Kevin Ballon, Sara Bodinson, Anna Burckhardt, Ava Childers, Aaron Harrow, Elle Kim, Diana Pan, Prudence Peiffer, Jason Persse, Damien Saatdjian, Sean Yetter, MoMA AV

© 2021 The Museum of Modern Art

Client:

The Museum of Modern Art

Reconstructions: Architecture and Blackness in America

Feb 27–May 31, 2021
Website https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/5219

It was quiet inside the MoMA. Its doors already closed, all visitors departed hours ago.
But there was some muted activity in the galleries on the third floor with its windows looking out over the MoMA garden. Two cameras with huge fisheye lenses set on top of a dolly that was making its way around the artwork.
The exhibition that was filmed in 360 that night at the museum was Reconstructions: Architecture and Blackness in America and featured newly commissioned works by 10 architects, designers, and artists “that explore ways in which histories can be made visible…”.
It was two weeks before closing. The purpose of the 360 video was to preserve a record of this landmark exhibition. It was the first time that the works of black architects were exhibited at the MoMA.
The exhibition was organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator in the Department of Architecture and Design of The Museum of Modern Art at that time, and Mabel O. Wilson, Nancy and George E. Rupp Professor at Columbia University.

“How does race structure America’s cities? …
Centuries of disenfranchisement and race-based violence have led to a built environment that is not only compromised but also, as the critic Ta-Nehisi Coates contends, “argues against the truth of who you are.” These injustices are embedded in nearly every aspect of America’s design—an inheritance of segregated neighborhoods, compromised infrastructures, environmental toxins, and unequal access to financial and educational institutions.
Each project in the exhibition proposes an intervention in one of 10 cities: from the front porches of Miami and the bayous of New Orleans to the freeways of Oakland and Syracuse. Reconstructions examines the intersections of anti-Black racism and Blackness within urban spaces as sites of resistance and refusal…”

The artworks, a mix of sculptures, collages, prints and paintings, were captured with a majority of moving shots with the aforementioned dolly. The movement gives them dimension and provides context of their size, the room  and their relationships to the other artworks.
Post-production posed a distinct challenge of its own: which of the artworks to include and which ones to leave out for a ~ 5 minute video?
Due to the impossibility to assign more or less importance to any of the works, the decision was reached to showcase all of them in the 360 video. Moving through the space the viewer hears the voices of the artists talking about their works as well as the audio or music that accompanied the works in the gallery. At some points in the video is augmented by the works detaching from the wall and floating closer to the viewer.

Included Projects:
Mario Gooden. The Refusal of Space. Nashville, TN
Yolanda Daniels, Black City: The Los Angeles Edition, Los Angeles, CA
Sekou Cooke, We Outchea, Syracuse, NY
Felecia Davis, Fabricating Networks, Hill District, Pittsburgh, PA
Germane Barnes, A Spectrum of Blackness, Miami, FL
Emanuel Admassu, Immeasurability, Atlanta, GA
Mitch McEwen, R:R,New Orleans, LA
Walter J. Hood, Black Towers / Black Power, Oakland, CA
Olalekan Jeyifous, The Frozen Neighborhoods, Crown Heights, Brooklyn, NY
Amanda Williams, “We’re Not Down There, We’re Over Here”, Kinloch, MO

Credits:

Producer: Aaron Louis, Director of Audio Visual, MoMA
360 video production: Koncept VR, NYC
Director/VFX: Joergen Geerds, Koncept VR
Cinematographer/Editor: Ulrike Futschik, Koncept VR

Special thanks to Sean Anderson, Kevin Ballon, Sara Bodinson, Anna Burckhardt, Ava Childers, Aaron Harrow, Elle Kim, Diana Pan, Prudence Peiffer, Jason Persse, Damien Saatdjian, Sean Yetter, MoMA AV

© 2021 The Museum of Modern Art

Client:

The Museum of Modern Art

The Tuskegee Airmen